How to Become a Contestant on America's Got Talent

From Best Jobs Info Guide

Jump to: navigation, search


To become a contestant on America's Got Talent, an individual has to complete the show's lengthy audition process. Those who are selected for the program have the opportunity to compete on national television for a chance to win a $1 million prize. The America's Got Talent competition was created by American Idol judge Simon Cowell. The program airs on the NBC television channel during the summer.[1]



Wikimedia Commons: bcbusinesshub
Education No formal education required
Starting pay N/A
Median pay N/A
10 yr growth N/A
Related professions Britain's Got Talent contestant
Author Selena Robinson
 

Interested in learning how to make money online FAST? Sign up for our newsletter here to learn about the best ways to earn online that are working right NOW

Contents

America's Got Talent Contestant Job Overview

Contestants on America's Got Talent are expected to perform live numbers in front of the show's celebrity judging panel. While individuals can choose to showcase any talent, many of the contestants are singers, dancers, or magicians. If the judges like a performance, they allow a contestant to pass on to the next round. If they do not like the performance, they signal their dislike with a large red "X" that appears above the stage. The number of contestants is reduced each week until the final two compete on the show's season finale.[2]

America's Got Talent Contestant Education

While no specific education is required to become an America's Got Talent contestant, many performers do have experience in a specific skill, such as performing, playing music, or singing. Unlike other reality show competitions such as American Idol, America's Got Talent does not place age restrictions on contestants. Anyone of any age is eligible to audition. However, those who are younger than age 18 must have the consent of a parent or legal guardian to try out for the program.[3]

America's Got Talent Contestant Training

After passing the initial audition process, contestants on America's Got Talent must design and perform new numbers each week in order to remain in the competition. This often involves extensive rehearsing and practicing before the live show airs. As the show progresses through higher competition rounds, contestants may perform with accomplished musicians and artists, which may require additional practice and training. For example, during the 2013 season, eventual show winner Kenichi Ebina performed original choreography to a live performance by singer Heather Headley and Italian opera group Il Divo.[4]

America's Got Talent Contestant Open Calls

Auditions for America's Got Talent are held during the months of January and February in select U.S. cities. 2014 America's Got Talent audition cities include Atlanta, Georgia, Miami, Florida, Denver, Colorado, and New York City, New York. To audition in person at an open call, individuals may register on the America's Got Talent website in advance to reserve a spot.[5] Walk-up auditions are also allowed at in-person open calls, but prospective contestants may have to wait an extended time before performing.[6] Those who audition in person must wait a month before finding out if they passed the initial audition round.[7]

America's Got Talent Winner 2013

Kenichi Ebina is crowned the winner of America's Got Talent in 2013

Also See: How to Become a Contestant on Britain's Got Talent, How to Become a Contestant on American Idol, How to Become a Contestant on America's Best Dance Crew, How to Become a Singer, How to Become a Dancer, How to Become a Circus Performer

References

  1. http://www.nbc.com/americas-got-talent#About
  2. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gbOAA3PIQxA
  3. http://www.nbc.com/americas-got-talent/auditions
  4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IkY2A92Y0wc
  5. http://www.agtauditions.com/
  6. http://www.indystar.com/story/entertainment/movies/2014/01/25/americas-got-talent-tryouts-attract-crowd-at-convention-center/4900499/
  7. http://www.news-record.com/life/article_dc584052-8910-11e3-86b6-001a4bcf6878.html