How to Become a Nanny

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Nannies step in and take care of children when their parents are at work, on a vacation or trip, or need an extra hand around the house.[1] A person does not need a college degree to become a nanny. Many employers do, however, prefer that nannies have a high school diploma or GED.[2]


Nanny.jpg

[Flicker: Chie]
Education High school diploma or GED[2]
Starting pay $7.85/hour[3]
Median pay $9.38[3]
10 yr growth Average:14%[4]
Related professions Babysitter, child care provider
Author Selena Robinson
 

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Contents

Nanny Job Overview

Nannies provide basic care for children. They may work on a full-time or part-time basis, such as after school or in the evenings. Typical duties of a nanny include supervising the children, preparing meals and snacks, making sure the children take a bath and brush their teeth, changing diapers, driving children to school and events, tutoring children in their basic education, and providing emotional support and guidance.[1]

The Difference Between a Babysitter and a Nanny

While nannies and babysitters both provide similar services, there is a big difference between the two. Babysitters provide care for children when parents only need it for a few hours. While parents may be repeat customers, babysitters usually do not function as a primary caregiver role. Nannies on the other hand, usually live inside the home, provide care over the course of a child’s life, and are considered primary caregivers.[5]

Nanny Education

Nannies are not required to earn a college degree. They only have to graduate from high school or pass the state’s GED exam. However, some nannies choose to earn an associate’s degree in early childhood education or childhood care to enhance their careers and earn higher salaries. Most community colleges offer a degree in early childhood education, development and education.[2]

Students have several options for studying for the GED. They can take classes at a local or state program, through a local church or non-profit organization, at a university or college or online.[2] Some may also take advantage of GED study programs at home that include courses in math, science, history, and grammar.[6]

Nanny Training

Some nannies choose to advance their career by taking certification classes.[7] In addition, many states and employers require that nannies take some form of formal training before they can receive a license.[2]

Nanny certification coursework includes training in etiquette, early childhood development, first aid and CPR, lifeguarding, and education. Classes are available at the Childcare Education Institute, Northwest Nannies, English Nannies and Governess School and Norland Academy.[8][9][10][11]

What Parents Look for in a Nanny Video

Parents look for nannies who possess a variety of skills and personality traits.

Also See: How to Become a Child Psychologist, How to Become a School Bus Driver, How to Become a Substitute Teacher in Delaware, How to Become a Principal

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Personal-Care-and-Service/Childcare-workers.htm#tab-2
  2. 2.0 2.1 2.2 2.3 2.4 http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Personal-Care-and-Service/Childcare-workers.htm#tab-4
  3. 3.0 3.1 http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Personal-Care-and-Service/Childcare-workers.htm#tab-5
  4. http://www.bls.gov/ooh/Personal-Care-and-Service/Childcare-workers.htm#tab-1
  5. http://www.care.com/child-care-what-is-the-difference-between-a-babysitter-and-a-nanny-p1017-q13314590.html
  6. http://www.pennfoster.edu/programs-and-degrees/high-school/high-school-diploma
  7. http://www.nanny-governess.com/abouttheschool.html
  8. http://www.cceionline.edu/certificateCatalog.cfm
  9. http://www.nwnanny.com/
  10. http://www.nanny-governess.com/
  11. http://www.norland.co.uk/careers/norland_nanny